Wednesday, October 17, 2012

60 OS Replacements for Storage Software

http://www.datamation.com/open-source/60-os-replacements-for-storage-software-1.html


According to IDC, the amount of digital data in our universe is doubling every two years. They say that in 2011 our world generated 1.8 zettabytes (1.8 trillion gigabytes) of data. The research firm also reports that enterprises store 80 percent of that data at some point during its lifecycle.
The problem: while the amount of storage capacity needed is growing incredibly rapidly, enterprise budgets are not increasing at the same rate.
As a result, enterprises are increasingly looking to open source solutions to help them manage their huge data stores while keeping costs down. And the open source community also has many storage-related projects that can help small businesses and consumers with their storage needs as well.
This month, Datamation is updating our list or open source software that can replace commercial storage solutions. We put together a mix of storage-related projects for home users and companies of all sizes.
Here you'll find software that you can use with industry-standard hardware to create your own storage device, utilities to help you maximize your available storage capacity, and a host of other tools to help you manage your stored data.
As always, if you have additional suggestions for the list, please note them in the comments section below.

Backup

1. Amanda
Replaces Symantec NetBackup, NovaBackup, Barracuda Backup Service
Short for "Advanced Maryland Automatic Network Disk Archiver," Amanda is a mature tool that can back up data from a very high number of workstations connected to a LAN. Currently, Zmanda supports Amanda's development and offers related cloud-based products. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X.
2. Areca Backup
Replaces Norton Ghost, McAfee Online Backup, NovaBackup
Appropriate for very small businesses or home users, Areca backs up individual workstations. Easy setup and versatility make this open source backup solution popular, and it supports some advanced backup features, including delta backup. Operating System: Windows, Linux.
3. Bacula
Replaces Symantec NetBackup, NovaBackup, Barracuda Backup Service
One of the most popular open source backup solutions for enterprise users, Bacula offers a suite of tools to backup, verify and recover data from large networks. See Bacula Systems for commercial support. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X.
4. Clonezilla
Replaces Backup Exec, Norton Ghost
Created as a replacement for Symantec Software, Clonezilla is a backing and cloning solution that allows bare metal backup and recovery, as well as multicasting for deploying multiple systems at once. Choose Clonezilla Live for backing up a single machine or Clonezilla SE to clone more than 40 systems at once. Operating System: Linux.
5. Create Synchronicity
Replaces Norton Ghost, McAfee Online Backup, NovaBackup
This solution's claim to fame is its extremely lightweight size. A good option for standalone systems, it's customizable and easy to use. Operating System: Windows.
6. FOG
Replaces Symantec NetBackup, NovaBackup, Barracuda Backup Service
Popular with schools and small businesses, FOG resides on a Linux-based server and provides cloning functionality for Windows-based networked PCs. It offers an easy-to-use Web interface, and it includes features like virus scanning, testing, disk wiping and file recovery,. Operating System: Linux, Windows.
7. Partimage
Replaces Norton Ghost
Like FOG, Partimage runs on a Linux server, and it can clone Windows or Linux PCs connected to the network. Because it only images used blocks, it often runs faster than similar backup tools. Operating System: Windows, Linux.
8. Redo
Replaces Norton Ghost, McAfee Online Backup, NovaBackup
This backup solution boasts that it can do a bare-metal restore in under ten minutes. The website also claims that Redo is "so simple that anyone can use it," and  calls it "the easiest, most complete disaster recovery solution available." Operating System: Windows, Linux.

Compression

9. 7-zip
Replaces WinZip
Compressing files before you store them can help minimize the amount of storage capacity you need. 7-zip supports ZIP files and several popular compression formats, including 7Z files, which offer 30-70 percent greater compression than ZIP files. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X.
10. KGB Archiver
Replaces WinZip
KGC Archiver claims to offer an "unbelievable high compression rate" that's even better than 7Z. It also offers AES-256 encryption. Operating System: Windows.
11. PeaZip
Replaces WinZip
This incredibly versatile compression utility supports more than 150 different formats. It also includes security features like strong encryption, two factor authentication, encrypted password manager and secure deletion. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X.

Databases

12. Kexi
Replaces Microsoft Access, FileMaker
A KDE application, Kexi is sometimes called "Microsoft Access for Linux." It offers visual tools for database creation and a database engine (SQLite), but it can also be used with MySQL or PostgreSQL servers. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X.
13. LucidDB
Replaces Microsoft SQL Server
LucidDB claims to be "the first and only open-source RDBMS purpose-built entirely for data warehousing and business intelligence." Accordingly, it offers advanced analytics capabilities and good scalability. Operating System: Windows, Linux.
14. MySQL
Replaces Microsoft SQL Server
This Oracle-owned project boasts that it's the "world's most popular open source database." It comes in several commercial editions in addition to the open source version. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X.
15. PostgreSQL
Replaces Microsoft SQL Server
PostgreSQL's website claims, "Unlike many proprietary databases, it is extremely common for companies to report that PostgreSQL has never, ever crashed for them in several years of high activity operation. Not even once." It's won numerous awards and is standards-compliant. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X.


Data Destruction

16. BleachBit
Replaces Easy System Cleaner
If you need to clean out a hard drive and "shred" data so that it cannot be recovered, BleachBit is for you. In addition, it offers a number of other privacy protection tools that clean cache, erase Internet history, delete cookies, get rid of temporary files and eliminates other "junk" that slows down your system. Operating System: Windows, Linux.
17. Darik's Boot And Nuke
Replaces Kill Disk, BCWipe Total WipeOut
For those who need to eliminate the data on an entire drive, Darik's Boot and Nuke does the trick. Note, however, that this is primarily a home user and small business application and doesn't erase RAID arrays. Operating System: OS Independent.
18. Eraser
Replaces BCWipe Enterprise
Eraser's website notes, "Most people have some data that they would rather not share with others - passwords, personal information, classified documents from work, financial records, self-written poems, the list continues." If you want to delete these files from your hard drive, Eraser will write over the old data so that it can never be recovered. Operating System: Windows.
19. FileKiller
Replaces BCWipe Enterprise
Like Eraser, FileKiller "shreds" old files by rewriting over the stored data. It boasts fast performance, and it allows the end user to specify how many times to overwrite the file. Operating System: Windows.
20. Wipe
Replaces BCWipe Enterprise
Wipe is similar to Eraser and FileKiller, but it works on Linux instead of Windows. Operating System: Linux.

De-duplication

21. Bulk File Manager
Replaces NoClone 2010, FalconStor Data Deduplication
This app performs de-duplication at the file level. In addition, it also offers bulk re-naming, bulk moving, file splitting and file joining capabilities. Operating System: Windows.
22. Opendedup
Replaces NoClone 2010, FalconStor Data Deduplication
Opendedup performs inline de-duplication to reduce storage utilization by up to 95 percent. It's available as an appliance for simplified setup and deployment. Operating System: Windows, Linux.

Document Management Systems (DMS)

23. Epiware
Replaces Documentum, Microsoft SharePoint, OpenText
This document manager offers features like search, access history, version history, calendaring, project management and a wiki. Paid support is available. Operating System: Windows, Linux.
24. LogicalDOC
Replaces Documentum, Microsoft SharePoint, OpenText
LogicalDOC boasts an easy and intuitive interface that runs through any browser. You can choose to run the free or paid version on your own server, or opt for the no-hassle cloud version. Operating System: OS Independent.
25.OpenDocMan
Replaces Documentum, Microsoft SharePoint, OpenText
OpenDocMan offers fine-grained control, Web-based access and compliance with ISO 17025 and the OIE standard for document management. In addition to the open source community version, it comes in a hosted professional version or an on-premise enterprise version. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X.
26. OpenKM
Replaces Documentum, Microsoft SharePoint, OpenText
This highly usable document management solution offers capabilities like sharing content, setting security roles, auditing, and finding enterprise documents and registers. It comes in community, professional, cloud and university versions. Operating System: OS Independent.
27. Xinco DMS
Replaces Documentum, Microsoft SharePoint, OpenText
Short for "eXtensible INformation COre," Xinco offers Web-based management of files, documents, contacts, URLs and more. Features include ACLs, version control and full text search. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X.

File Systems

28. Ceph
Replaces Unified storage hardware from Dell, EMC, HP
Ceph is a distributed file system that offers unified object, block and file-level storage. Professional support and services are available through InkTank. Operating System: Linux.
29. Gluster
Replaces hardware from EMC, IPDATA, Netgear
Sponsored by Red Hat, the Gluster file system offers unified file and object storage, as well as storage for Hadoop deployments. It's self-healing and can scale to 72 brontobytes. Operating System: Linux.
30. Lustre
Replaces hardware from EMC, IPDATA, Netgear
Oracle-owned Lustre boasts that it can handle very large and complex storage needs, "scaling to tens of thousands of nodes and petabytes of storage with groundbreaking I/O and metadata throughput." Note that although the name is similar to "Gluster," the two are completely independent projects. Operating System: Linux.


31. ZFS
Replaces hardware from EMC, IPDATA, Netgear
Originally developed by Sun, this file system supports very high storage capacities and offers features like error checking, RAID capabilities and data deduplication. It has been incorporated in many other open source projects, including FreeNAS and NAS4Free. Operating System: Solaris, OpenSolaris, Linux, OS X, FreeBSD.

File Managers

32. Explorer++
Replaces Windows Explorer
Explorer++ extends the capabilities of the standard Windows Explorer with tabbed browsing, an improved interface, keyboard shortcuts, file merge, file split, and customization capabilities. Like the regular Windows Explorer, it also offers drag-and-drop functionality. Operating System: Windows.
33. muCommander
Replaces Windows Explorer, xplorer
Java-based muCommander offers a dual-pane file management interface with a light footprint. It allows users to modify zipped files on the fly, and it supports multiple file transfer protocols. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X.
34. Nautilus
Replaces Windows Explorer, xplorer
Nautilus, the file manager for the Gnome desktop, is available for most Linux distributions. The intuitive interface should feel familiar to anyone who's ever used a file manager. Operating System: Linux.
35. PCManFM
Replaces Windows Explorer, xplorer
The standard file manager for the LXDE desktop, PCManFM also supports other Linux desktops. Its features include drag-and-drop support, thumbnails, icon view, tabbed windows and trash can support. Operating System: Linux.
36. QTTabBar
Replaces Windows Explorer
Similar to Explorer++, this very popular open source project extends the functionality of Windows Explorer with tabs and other interface improvements. Support for Windows 8 is planned. Operating System: Windows.
37. SurF
Replaces Windows Explorer, xplorer
SurF brings a fresh approach to file management with a unique, tree-based list of files. Other features include brief highlighting of new and recently changed files, auto-complete for search terms and network support. Operating System: Windows.
38. Thunar
Replaces Windows Explorer, xplorer
Used by the Xfce desktop environment, Thunar boasts a clean interface and very fast performance. It includes a bulk renamer and an extensions framework so that you can add any functionality you like. Operating System: Linux.
39. TuxCommander
Replaces Windows Explorer, xplorer
Like other "Commander" style file managers, TuxCommander offers a two-paned interface. It also features support for large files, a tabbed interface, a customizable mounter bar, associations and more. Operating System: Linux.

File Transfer

40. FileZilla
Replaces CuteFTP, FTP Commander
This project includes both server and client software for transferring files via FTP, FTPS or SFTP. Note that the server software is Windows only, but the client software is multiplatform. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X.
41. WinSCP
Replaces CuteFTP, FTP Commander
Tremendously popular, WinSCP has been downloaded more than 64 million times. It's an SFTP, SCP, FTPS and FTP client, and it offers basic file manager capabilities. Operating System: Windows.

Hierarchical Storage Management

42. OHSM
Replaces IBM Tivoli Storage Manager HSM, HPSS, EMC DiskXtender
Short for Online Hierarchical Storage Manager, OHSM automatically moves data between high- and low-cost storage media in accordance with the policies set up by the administrator. It allows policies for allocation (where to put a new file) and relocation (when to move an existing file). Operating System: Linux.

NAS

43. FreeNAS
Replaces EMC Isilon products, IPDATA appliances, Netgear ReadyNAS
Based on FreeBSD, FreeNAS allows users to create a network-attached storage (NAS) device that will allow them to share files with other systems on the network, regardless of what operating system those systems use. It includes ZFS and incorporates both file and volume management capabilities. Operating System: FreeBSD.
44. NAS4Free
Replaces EMC Isilon products, IPDATA appliances, Netgear ReadyNAS
A fork of FreeNAS, this project also creates a BSD-based NAS system. Key features include ZFS, Software RAID (0, 1, 5), disk encryption and reporting. Operating System: FreeBSD.
45. Openfiler
Replaces EMC Isilon products, IPDATA appliances, Netgear ReadyNAS
This storage management solution combines some of the characteristics of NAS with some of the characteristics of SAN devices. Use it with any industry-standard server to create your own storage device. Commercial support and plug-ins are available. Operating System: Linux.


46. OpenSMT
Replaces EMC Isilon products, IPDATA appliances, Netgear ReadyNAS
Like Openfiler, OpenSMT also allows users to turn standard system hardware into a dedicated storage device with some NAS features and some SAN features. It uses the ZFS filesystem and includes a convenient Web GUI. Operating System: OpenSolaris.
47. Turnkey Linux File Server
Replaces EMC Isilon products, IPDATA appliances, Netgear ReadyNAS
Turnkey offers a wide variety of Linux-based software that you can use to create your own appliance. The File Server version creates a simple NAS device. Operating System: Linux.

Online Data Storage

48. Cyn.in
Replaces Box, DropBox, ADrive, Amazon Cloud Drive, Google Drive
This open source collaboration suite allows users to share, organize, search and collaboratively work on files. In addition to the open source download, it's also available as a paid enterprise appliance or on an SaaS basis. Operating System: Server requires Linux; client versions are OS independent.
49. FTPbox
Replaces Box, DropBox, ADrive, Amazon Cloud Drive, Google Drive
FTPbox makes it easy to sync your files across multiple devices or share your files with others. It can use SFTP or FTPS protocol for secure file transmission. Operating System: Windows.
50. iFolder
Replaces Box, DropBox, ADrive, Amazon Cloud Drive, Google Drive
Built with syncing, backup and file sharing in mind, iFolder works much like DropBox. Simple save your files locally as usually, and iFolder will update them on your server and the other workstations you use. It was originally founded by Novell and is now managed by Kablink. Operating System: Linux, OS X.
51. OwnCloud
Replaces Box, DropBox, ADrive, Amazon Cloud Drive, Google Drive
As the name suggests, OwnCloud makes it possible to create your own cloud for storing music, photos and all other kinds of files. Supported business and enterprise versions are available. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X.
52. SparkleShare
Replaces Box, DropBox, ADrive, Amazon Cloud Drive, Google Drive
Because it was built for developers, this online storage solution includes version control software (Git, to be specific). It automatically syncs all files with the hosts, and it allows you to set up multiple projects with different hosts. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X.
53. Syncany
Replaces Box, DropBox, ADrive, Amazon Cloud Drive, Google Drive
Syncany works with commercial online storage solutions like Amazon S3 or Google Storage, adding better synchronization functionality (akin to DropBox) and improved security. It encrypts files locally, making it more feasible to use an online service to store sensitive data. Operating System: Linux (Windows and OS X versions planned.)

RAID Controllers

54. Mdadm
Replaces RAID hardware from vendors like Dell, EMC, HP, IBM
Part of the Linux kernel, Mdadm is software that makes it possible to build your own RAID array with standard hardware. It can also monitor and report on RAID arrays. Operating System: Linux.
55. Raider
Replaces RAID hardware from vendors like Dell, EMC, HP, IBM
Raider allows users to convert any Linx disk system into a RAID array. It supports RAID levels 1, 4, 5, 6 or 10. Operating System: Linux.
56. RaidEye
Replaces RAID hardware from vendors like Dell, EMC, HP, IBM
Just as Raider and Mdadm allow you to turn Linux systems into RAID arrays, RaidEye does the same thing for Macs. It's a monitoring tool that works with the built-in RAID capabilities in OS X. Operating System: OS X.
57. Salamander
Replaces RAID hardware from vendors like Dell, EMC, HP, IBM
Another Linux project, Salamander simplifies the process of turning a multi-disk system into a RAID system. As for the name, the website explains, "Salamanders are the only vertebrates that can regenerate limbs. In the same way, a system installed with Salamander can regenerate after a hard-drive failure." Operating System: Linux.
58. SnapRAID
Replaces RAID hardware from vendors like Dell, EMC, HP, IBM
SnapRAID is a non-standard RAID level for storage arrays. It uses snapshot backup capabilities to provide redundancy that protects against the failure of up to two disks in an array. Operating System: OS X.

Storage Virtualization Mangement

59. Libvirt Storage Management
Replaces DataCore Software, VMware vSphere, SolarWinds Storage Manager, IBM
This open source API provides an array of virtualization management capabilities, including storage management capabilities. It supports multiple hypervisors, including, KVM, Xen, VMware, Hyper-V and others. Operating System: Linux.
60. oVirt
Replaces DataCore Software, VMware vSphere, SolarWinds Storage Manager, IBM
Like Libvirt, oVirt can manage many different types of virtualized environments, including virtualized storage. It supports the KVM hypervisor only. Operating System: Linux.

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