Thursday, October 1, 2009

Hacking Two-Factor Authentication

Back in 2005, I wrote about the failure of two-factor authentication to mitigate banking fraud:
Here are two new active attacks we're starting to see:
  • Man-in-the-Middle attack. An attacker puts up a fake bank website and entices user to that website. User types in his password, and the attacker in turn uses it to access the bank's real website. Done right, the user will never realize that he isn't at the bank's website. Then the attacker either disconnects the user and makes any fraudulent transactions he wants, or passes along the user's banking transactions while making his own transactions at the same time. 
  • Trojan attack. Attacker gets Trojan installed on user's computer. When user logs into his bank's website, the attacker piggybacks on that session via the Trojan to make any fraudulent transaction he wants.
See how two-factor authentication doesn't solve anything? In the first case, the attacker can pass the ever-changing part of the password to the bank along with the never-changing part. And in the second case, the attacker is relying on the user to log in.
Here's an example:
The theft happened despite Ferma's use of a one-time password, a six-digit code issued by a small electronic device every 30 or 60 seconds.
Online thieves have adapted to this additional security by creating special programs--real-time Trojan horses--that can issue transactions to a bank while the account holder is online, turning the one-time password into a weak link in the financial security chain. "I think it's a broken model," Ferrari says.
Of course it's a broken model. We have to stop trying to authenticate the person; instead, we need to authenticate the transaction:
One way to think about this is that two-factor authentication solves security problems involving authentication.
The current wave of attacks against financial systems are not exploiting vulnerabilities in the authentication system, so two-factor authentication doesn't help. Security is always an arms race, and you could argue that this situation is simply the cost of treading water.
The problem with this reasoning is it ignores countermeasures that permanently reduce fraud. By concentrating on authenticating the individual rather than authenticating the transaction, banks are forced to defend against criminal tactics rather than the crime itself.
Credit cards are a perfect example. Notice how little attention is paid to cardholder authentication.
Clerks barely check signatures. People use their cards over the phone and on the Internet, where the card's existence isn't even verified. The credit card companies spend their security dollar authenticating the transaction, not the cardholder.

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